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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
at sigtarp and was also at the u.s. securities and exchange commission who -- and served as counsel to mary schapiro and christopher cox. and investigative financial fraud, insider trading and other violations of securities law. she spent time as a litigator. her jd is from brigham young law school and she went to school here, old dominion university. the special inspector general from tarp and a recent report. treasury continues approving excessive -- excessive pay. on twitter -- is this all hindsight? guest: it is interesting. one of the things we constantly report on is things that should have been done better. you have to respect that a lot of decisions were made with a sense of urgency. but the compensation decisions were not. there was plenty of time to set up a good system for that. and even for the discount -- for the decisions that were made in a rush, it is really important we point out how things could have been done better. let's say we get and the situation where there is another crisis. and treasury and the regulators are running around with a sense of courtesy in an emergency
on christmas day. that's what we're talking about. so this is somebody who had said that he doesn't want his u.s. citizenship anymore, he had officially joined al qaeda. al qaeda had declared war on the united states. so when people say there's a list of americans, not really. this a time honored tradition. the legal basis goes back many years when u.s. citizens would go on flight for foreign nations that were engaging in combat with the united states. so what they were saying is once you've made that choice, you no loca longer get the protections that you would. if you join the enemies oversea, you joan the enein the enemies . we do have oversight. i knew about the operations leading up to it and i review all of the air strikes that we use under this title of the law. >> well, you review the air strikes after the fact, correct? >> in this particular case, we knew -- well, remember, the air strike itself is just a tool at the end of the day. the policy, research, intelligence packages is what leads up to it. this is just, to be very blunt about it, pulling the trig ger t the end of the day. so a
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
military community where he plans to highlight painful cuts they say for the pentagon and the u.s. navy. but republican leaders calling on the president to quote, stop campaigning and help them solve the problem. but at the moment, there are no meetings planned between any of these sides, the house, the senate, the white house and they're taking friday off as of now. martha: all right. well the looming budget cuts were high on the agenda when the president sat down with the national governors association yesterday. arizona governor jan brewer went "on the record" with greta van susteren to get her impressions exactly what happened at that meeting. here's that. >> you know, he definitely says he wants to work together but obviously he doesn't want to compromise one little bit. bottom line he wants to raise taxes. and he doesn't want to cut. i think the american people believed, that the time now is to start cutting the budget. martha: so when it came to compromising governor brewer went on to say that the president said that the elections were basically behind him and that he was going t
the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non- citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's knowledge of targeted strikes, and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actually, we received a short one and a long o
. howard, will you dot honors? [applause] >> u.s. senator, vice president of the united states, nobel peace prize recipient, as cor winner, best selling author, any one of these superlatives alone would be enough to suggest that our next speaker is a force with which to be reckoned, but when combined into one individual, it is evident that al gore is a force of nature. he is always been on the leading edge of promoting the internet as a tool for greater communication, of climate change as one of the greatest perils of our time, and in his latest book, "the future," of the key medical technological, and philosophical drivers checking our world. ever the big picture thinker, al gore explores how we may harness these epic change agents for the good. although his public professionalized had it not been without controversy, his record of accomplishments speak to the life lived on the precipice of passion, purpose, and possibility. on behalf of the savannah book festival, it is by great honor to introduce to all of you al gore. [applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you very much, thank you. t
agencies and what not. and this may surprise you but not all parts of the u.s. government work together seamlessly. [laughter] so here we are, as this cycle and we have these things, what we call blinks between the parts and so one element would find a target but by the time the information got to the people who were going to fix it usually with a predator or something like that to make sure they're there then, time would have passed and accuracy of information, fidelity would have passed. then it would be passed over to the raid force. again you have a loss. like the game telephone where you whisper around the room, it is untellable by the fifth person we're trying to do things in that system. we said this is madness. it won't work. we went on a campaign to fix that process, bringing in different parts of the organization, building intelligence capacity. giving ourselves a mind-set that was different before. if each element did its part of the process they could take pride, we succeeded, we did what we were told. we wiped that clean, nobody is successful unless the whole process works.
korea. why were they part of the axis of the evil? so a chance we had to improve the u.s. and iranian relationship was really undermined with that speech, and we've been going over this past ten years and in 2002 you get the iraq war, one of the two american war the united states failed to engage in in the past decade. obama unfortunately comes in with very little background in foreign policy never paid attention to it, served in washington for two years and was a into a sestak supporter but those that new national security could be a problem when he appointed the secretary of state for domestic reasons the secretary of defense for domestic reasons and appointed a retired marine general to be the national security adviser he lasted a lot a year but leon panetta and i know he's one of your neighbors in california she was captured by the operation mentality of the cia before he'd been in the building more than a month this was a national security team obama also was by the military that's how you got the surge of the forces i think he realizes he had by the military and that is importan
this week. here is the a.p. headline. u.s. limited in fight against north african militants. the united states is struggling to confront an uptick in threats in the newest hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the obama administration weighs who you to keep islamic extremists from jeopardizing national security without launching war. we want to put up a map here. and explain to people where this is. egypt, libya, algeria, mali, niger. when i read about the idea that we don't have enough intelligence, we've known about al qaeda in north africa since before 9/11. this is the original safe haven of osama bin laden, was north africa. did we drop the ball? >> you know, when al qaeda attacked the united states on 9/11, and it became clear that we had to go to war on terrorism against al qaeda, we focused on al qaeda's core leadership and where they were at. and we've done that. we've gone after them in pakistan, afghanistan, and going after them in yemen, going after them in somalia. yes, they are out there. >> it's been out there a long time, right? it's not new. >>
church in the u.s. and in ireland and other countries? tonight i will tell you what i think. i know who the front runner is right now and what we can expect of him. and let's face it, the election of a pope is a political as well as a spiritual undertaking. ambition and humility both play their roles. the stakes, who will lead the church for the years ahead, probably for our lifetimes. it's going to matter and not just to catholics. i'm joined by melinda henneberger and e.j. dionne. here is my pick, cardinal angelo scola, just barely young enough to make it. the biggest thing he has going in his favor, the pope wants him, and there are a lot of voting cardinals who owe the pope. a majority were picked by the fellow right there, his holiness. about 56%, close to the two-thirds needing to win. he's italian, that always helps. he's european. 62, a majority are from europe. you know how political i'm getting here? i'm just starting here, melinda. this is a political enterprise. it's a secular event, and it's an election, very democratic. my bet is that this pope wants a quick election becau
the combatant commander, the commander of u.s. africom and i want to assure you there's been a bunch of speculation about the word risk averse, we needed the country's permission to come in. if we had been able to get them with anything we would have come under the command of the u.s. africa. >> eventually did those go to aaa? >> they did. >> why were they taken off the plane and told to change from their uniforms to other close? >> it was relayed through the embassy. >> how much did upslope the response? >> probably 30 minutes. >> i read other places an hour-and-a-half to two hours. >> that's my estimate i know it was an occurrence. >> why did they go to tripoli rather than benghazi? >> i think it was an 12 hours one we had moved all of the people out? >> and did they go to germany? >> the question i've had since the very start of this is why didn't somebody asked at that time what happened before this all started which would have solved the question about whether there was a demonstration going on or not and i asked that question before solnit the fbi was about to talk to them whic
government in massachusetts. nearly 30 years as a u.s. senator. the only committee that he served on from the day he became a senator, until its last day in the center of the foreign relations committee. he grew up with a father in the foreign service. it is a family calling. i will count it as a joy but as a bittersweet sadness that my service in the senate, i got to serve with him on the foreign relations committee for one week. [laughter] i am the junior senator on that committee. i sit far out on the wing on that committee. it was the first committee vote i cast was to confirm him as the new secretary. senator, you are coming to a place that believes deeply in the values that you share, as robert mentioned. president jefferson strongly believed in the connection of this wonderful exemplary nations to a world community. we have been a global leader. i always like to think about the global leadership that tries to balance military strength. secretary kerry knows the importance and limits of that spirit diplomatic strength, the strength of our economy, the strength of our moral example,
/10 of the u.s. in the next 24 to 48 hours. we have an update on what forecasters say could be the biggest storm in decades for some 32 million americans. and there are new questions about whether the policies of the federal reserve may be quietly crushing the retirement funds for millions of american workers. we'll look at that. >> we want to bring up to speed of the massive manhunt, for an accused mass murderer. the police in riverside, california will brief the media on the status of their investigation of the murder of a riverside police officer and the shooting of another officer. we of course will bring you that press conference if and when it happens live and keep you updated throughout the program on the progress, if any in finding this suspect. meanwhile, a shocking new report on the federal reserve. and how its policies of affecting your retirement funds. are they crushing them for millions of american workers? we're learning several major u.s. companies are pouring cash into pension plans and battered by record low interest rates. among those ford motor company is expected to s
of the u.s. senate. on week nights want the public policy events. every weekend, the lettuce nonfiction authors and books on book tv. you can see past programs and get our schedules and our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> here is where the story starts to get interesting. here is where the group's stock and to meet each other. i am condensing a lot of things, but i'll give you the basic just sent off to fort leavenworth. a lot of people in the army did not really like him. they didn't like officers to work to bookies or who stood up too much. and petreaus was guilty on both counts. so he is sent to fort leavenworth, kansas. a lot of people a thinking, oh, that's great. the fair hair boy, and rescinding about the pastor, chilly. but he gets to fort leavenworth and realizes something. he realizes that this is actually the intellectual center of the army. they write doctrine. they form the curriculum of the command and general staff college. they organized a national training centers. they -- the lessons for one affects the lessons of the other which
into a good movie. >> do you have any plans on expanding beyond the u.s. for instance if to europe [inaudible] thank you. >> international coverage is really interesting. i think that we are trying every single print issue of the magazine in at least a couple times a week to always have international content in the next. so we have had reported pieces from venezuela or we had someone embedded in afghanistan and we ran up peace in the last two issues on that so it's really important. the question just from the business standpoint is the economics that more often than not it works best for us to work with freelance reporters contributing for us in "the new york times" as well so we can get the content in the magazines but we don't have the bureau in paris or coal or something like that -- kabul or something like that that is the key to having a broad magazine in the future. >> are you going to make it weekly again? >> i don't think so. we don't have any plans to. it was hysterically, the previous ownership brought it down to buy a weekly. when i first bought the magazine i was a little skeptica
dempsey testify about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed ambassador christopher stevens and others. we will be live with the armed services committee starting at 10:00 a.m. on c-span. later, john brennan, the cia director joyce, testifying before the senate committee. he is expected to face questions on the cia drone program. we will be live with this program starting at 2:30 p.m. eastern also on c-span. >> if you go to most american history textbooks, if you go to the back of the textbooks you have in the basement, you can take me up on my bet. my bet with you is that in your american history textbooks in high school, you'll find no mention of eugenics. if you go to your biology books, you will find no mention of the word "eugenics. a biology books signed by most of the places, montana university, great textbooks, but i did not see any mention of eugenics. that is because we, scientists, no longer believe in eugenics, so we do not have to study it anymore. it was so awful that we can somehow pretend it is not part of american culture. >> part of lect
atrios and his advisers and how they change u.s. military strategy in his book, the insurgents. then jeffrey engel looking back at the gulf war. >> secretary john f. kerry and his speech as the new secretary. the council of foreign relations on a country of iraq and afghanistan. >> it has now become a capitalist situation. in china, they capitalize on this. as i said, it's all about preserving the power is the contrary continues to grow. they threw aside the vestiges of communism a long time ago. in north korea, it is all about preserving of the military and the dynasty that you have there. it really has nothing to do with what i think karl marx had a division way back. it has to do with a fascinating book on how communism was moved into asia. it is an absolutely fascinating split that occurred. >> keith richburg on 34 years of reporting and insight from around the world. sunday at 8:00 p.m. on c-span's "q&a." >> stanley mcchrystal retired from the army in 2010. the former commander has written a memoir. he talks about his book in the library in philadelphia in january. this is
tv.org. >> fred kaplan talks about how general david petraeus and his advisers transformed the u.s. military to fight future small wars against insurgents and terrorists. watch him for the next hour here on booktv. .. mr. kaplan spoke at the louisville free public library in kentucky. >> i admire those who do but that's not what i do. what i'm interested in is policies and ideas. where do these ideas come from? i mean, they don't just drop from the sky. usually they are not things that just automatically appeal to everybody as a matter of logic. where do the ideas come from? who are the people who advanced the idea? there's a lot of competing ideas. how did this particular set of ideas get translated into policy with the resistance? how is the resistance overcome? it usually isn't just one person, it's a community. how did this community form? what was the basis of it? that's what history is all about. it's a story. that's what these stories are about, it's about the interplay between personalities and politics, and policy. an accident, going to disappear so tha
life. i have been david and i have raised two children here. i have been a u.s. attorney for this area, and starting last month one of the hoosier state voices in the us house of representatives. i am proud to live in a state that spends less than it takes in, has a aaa credit rating and a budget surplus that will be partially repay to taxpayers areas the secret to our state success has been a value system that promotes a strong sense of responsibility and accountability. as family members, taxpayers, and community volunteers. for too long, the democratic majority in washington has failed to see the value in the sound model of working hard and living within your means. on their watch, we have been operating without a national budget. piling up debts that now exceed $60 trillion, and unemployment levels that remain stubbornly high. we are again at risk at having our credit rating downgraded. the spite these challenges, americans concerned about our nation spending problem may now have cause for optimism. i recent be voted along with my colleagues in the house for a simple but powerful c
a class on u.s. defense budgeting. at georgetown, we do care about these issues and we share your concerns, as well. in the defense budget of 2013, i understand 19% of the budget is being represented for personnel. about 26% is for procurement. 40% is for operations. if you look at all the different accounts for which the budget is requested, and the sequestration cuts across the board will affect seriously to the manpower, the modernization, and the leadership of the military. i have reviewed a lot of documents of the defense budget for many years in the past. i do not see a way how we can cut the defense budget. i do not see a way how sequestration will occur and not affect these three crucial defense-related areas. now, knowing that only around 4% of the gdp is being constituted by the base defense budget, and a bulk of the gdp -- >> we agree on your fax. what is the question? [laughter] >> right. this is a puzzle to me. my question is, this is really a puzzle. [laughter] how can you balance the budget without either cutting the defense budget or the mandatory account, medicare, medicai
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)